Friday, August 22, 2014

Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed



I loved reading this one. As I mentioned in my Instagram account - "This book is like a box of chocolates, I just can't stop reading another Dear Sugar letter." In hindsight, maybe I should have spaced them more. One or two a day would have allowed me to assimilate Sugar's responses and give me time to think about the wise things she wrote. And readers, wise she is considering she's not really old. Strayed is in her mid-forties, married with two young kids. In fact she's just a bit older than me but she is so much wiser and maybe it's because she went through so much as a young woman. She lost her mother at the tender age of 22. She was married and divorced by the time she was 25 and she had tons of different odd and not so fun jobs. One of the best ones was an unpaid gig as Sugar for The Rumpus website. It's curious how she debated whether to take the job or not considering she was down and out and it was unpaid.Thankfully for us she took the leap.

I don't think I'll ever forget some of the letters I read in this anthology. There's the one from Dead Dad, who lost his 22 year-old-son to a drunk driver; the one from the disfigured but wonderful young man looking for love; the one from the healthy young woman who is terrified she's going to get cancer one day; the one about the man who overheard his best friends talking negatively about him and his girlfriend; and so many other letters from ordinary people. Sugar's responses and reflections on her own life are also memorable. This is definitely a keeper. I highlighted so many lines and I know I'll be dipping into this again and again in the future. I do hope she writes a Volume 2.

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Euphoria by Lily King



I know, I know, I haven't been blogging at all lately but when I look back on my reading year, I've only read maybe three books that I'll include in my best of 2014 list. However, there are tons of fantastic books coming out soon - books by Sarah Waters, Ian McEwan, Michel Faber, Tana French and Haruki Murakami just to name a few. Things are looking up.

One book I read that stands out this year is Euphoria by Lily King. It's a novel loosely based on anthropologist Margaret Mead. It covers just a short span of time and in fact my only complaint is that at 256 pages it was too short! Just when I was beginning to get into the characters and the setting, the story ended. Mead was a controversial character in real life, writing books about sex in primitive societies. In Euphoria she is Nell Stone, an anthropologist who together with her husband studies native tribes in Papua, New Guinea. Enter another anthropologist, broodingly handsome Andrew Bankson and sparks fly. A love triangle ensues but not for long. The last scene was completely heartbreaking. This was a fascinating read not just for the story but for the close look at the work of anthropologists in the 1930s.

“It’s that moment about two months in, when you think you’ve finally got a handle on the place. Suddenly it feels within your grasp. It’s a delusion – you’ve only been there eight weeks – and it’s followed by the complete despair of ever understanding anything. But at the moment the place feels entirely yours. It’s the briefest, purest euphoria.”


Margaret Mead at work

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